Archive for category Inspiring

One of the best honesty experiments. NAB – The Honesty Experiment

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Dead Men Cooking – A Cookbook Hopefully Never be Served

A creative solution for death penalty advocacy brief. Raise my hat to Jung von Matt which really deserves the five years-in-a-row being agency of the year for the consistency on their juicy ideas.

Alive, a German organisation advocating for worldwide abolition of capital punishment, worked with Rocket & Wink and Jung von Matt to publish “Dead Men Walking”, a cookbook with dishes that will hopefully never be served. Inmates on death row in the United States were asked what they would want to eat on their last day. Forty of the recipes were then collected in one volume, which was sent to key decision-makers worldwide. The cover material is made from American prison clothes, closed by the kind of belt used on the electric chair.


Credits

The Dead Men Cooking project was developed at Jung von Matt, Hamburg (text and client service) and Rocket & Wink, Hamburg (design and illustration) by creative directors Doerte Spengler-Ahrens, Jan Rexhausen, Felix Fenz, copywriters Marc Freitag, David Wegener, Vicky Jacob-Ebbinghaus, Stefan Golde and Estelle Raschka, art director Alexander Norvilas, illustrators Alexander Rötterink, Reginald Wagner, Julika Dittmers, Adam Bunte, typographer Jule Dittmers.

Source : The Inspiration Room

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The Creative Pursuit of Laziness

It’s seems like a common understanding that companies have valuable assets if they have people who’s hard-working and staying late at the office.
However, the article and the infographic below suggest the opposite. Specially for you whose core work is to maintain fresh creativity, it’s time to be a bit creatively lazy (read: go home faster); and take a break from working too much in front of the computer/internet! Here’s why;


The Creative Pursuit Of Laziness

BY Jeffrey Paul Baumgartner

You start a new job with a new company. There are two employees in similar positions. They have both been with the company for several years. One is clearly hard working. She is constantly busy, juggles numerous tasks successfully and often stays late to get work done. The other seems much more relaxed. Indeed, she is often sharing jokes with her colleagues! She does not appear to work very hard, finishes tasks seemingly too quickly and is usually one of the first to leave the office at the end of the day. Which one should you emulate if you wish to do well in the company?

The seemingly lazy one, of course. Both have been with the company for some years, so you can assume that both are doing their job well. More importantly, you can assume that the apparently lazy one has worked out how to do her job efficiently, allowing her to work in a more relaxed way and go home at a reasonable hour daily.

CREATIVELY SEEKING THE EASY WAY

In my experience, this is something creative people are very good at, particularly if they work in organizations which do give them new creative challenges on a regular basis. They use their creative skills to find short cuts in performing regular tasks and improving the efficiency of their area of operations.

In truth, it is not just creative people who are lazy. Humans are programed to be lazy and this is a good thing. When our prehistoric ancestors were hunting and gathering, the less work expended to kill and skin a mammoth or to collect fruit, the better. Even today, it is sensible to ask why you should spend four hours performing a task that you can complete sufficiently well in an hour.

FOLLOWERS OR THINKERS

At work, when a new employee is shown how to perform a task, she will normally continue to do it in the way she was taught. This is not surprising. Most of us are taught to follow instructions, especially when a superior at work or school demonstrates tells us to do so.

But the creative individual is always questioning things and considering alternatives. She cannot help it. That’s how the creative mind is wired. She will try performing the task in different ways. Of course there are risks involved. An alternative approach to performing a four-hour task could prove more complicated than expected—and eat up eight hours of her time. She may be reprimanded by her superior for not doing the task in the prescribed manner. Worse, her method might not work at all, forcing her to start all over again.

However, this is normal for the creative person. Her curiosity and desire to explore alternatives is stronger than her sense of following instructions. Over time, she will try out various ways of performing tasks and will soon find the most efficient methods.

LESSONS TO BE LEARNED

As I wrote initially, if you are new to a company, do not look to the workaholics for advice on how to do your job well. Look to the laziest people. They will almost surely be able to show you the most efficient way to do your work well.

If you are an employer, on the other hand, those apparently lazy people are probably your most creative thinkers. When you need people with ideas for improving products, services and processes, be sure to include them in the teams responsible for developing these ideas. Moreover, be sure also to allow them to perform on these teams as they do on their tasks: let them try out ideas, see how they work, dispose of failed ideas and try out new ideas. This is how the creative process works.

The Internet Is Ruining Your Brain [INFOGRAPHIC]
by Stephanie Buck

Turns out, multi-tasking online doesn’t positively exercise our brains or mental state. Heavy Internet users are 2.5 times more likely to be depressed. And web addiction reduces the white matter in our brains, basically the transmitters responsible for our memory and sensory abilities.

Source : DesignTAXI, mashable.com

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Do People Still Fall For Banner Ads?

“Banner ads first appeared on the web in 1994 and since then they have been used extensively over the Internet. They are made to be eye catching and impressive so that they create an urge in the visitors to click into their business. But, their mass production and misuse has caused viewers to be skeptical and unresponsive to them. After 8 years, do people still fall for this attractive ad?”

Killer Infographics have produced an infographic for Prestige Marketing, looking at who’s clicking, why they click or don’t click, and the top three ways they are used. Check this out below, and scroll to the bottom for an example of one cool implementation of a banner ad:

So.. someone would most likely to survive a plane crash rather than click a banner ads.
But here’s one cool example of a creative banner ads. Do you think you’ll fall for this ad?

source : digitalbuzz, inspiration room

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Student’s App Queue Hacker : How Simple A Great Idea Can Be

A great idea should be sharp, simple, and able to cut through the problems directly. Well, theoretically it’s easy to say. But how to actually produce them? Here’s one handy inspiration from students in Manchester :

A student team on a three-week creative problem solving course at Hyper Island in Manchester, UK came up with the idea to move the queue outside of the Post Office so customers can do what they need to in their own time.

Queue Hacker was developed for the UK Post Office, from a brief delivered by the agency Dare. The students (Richard Trovatten, Paulo Yanaguizawa, Hanna Mejia Beaton, Leo Senra, and Thomas John Clegg) developed the idea for a real-time ticket app that allows customers to browse and order tickets wherever they are and lets them know how long it will be before they’re next in line. The video below illustrates their solution:

via PSFK

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The More You Sit, The Sooner You’ll Die

Yet another reason to push for stand-up desks: A recent study by Australia’s Sax Institute says sitting down for several hours a day could bring you to an early grave, even if you already exercise.

The study followed more than 200,000 Australian adults aged 45 and older from 2006 to 2010. It found that those who reported sitting for at least 11 hours a day had a 40% higher risk of dying within the next three years than people who sat for less than four hours a day. It’s part of the Sax Institute’s ongoing 45 and Up study, the largest study on healthy aging ever undertaken in the Southern Hemisphere.

While exercise has numerous health benefits, it doesn’t necessarily take away this risk. As reported in The Atlantic, “while the death risk was much lower for anyone who exercised five hours a week or more, it still rose as these active people sat longer.”

Long work hours aren’t the only cause of our sitting styles. According to The Atlantic, it’s estimated that the average adults spends 90% of his leisure time sitting.

“People tend to think they’re okay as long as they get their ‘dose’ of working out each day,” Mark Tremblay, obesity and activity researcher at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, told Reuters Health. However, he says, “Getting your 30 minutes of physical activity five times a week is not insurance against chronic disease.”

So what can we do to get on our feet more? For work, a stand-up desk might help — or even a treadmill desk, if you’re feeling more high-tech.

But we can’t forget the lifestyle factor to consider outside of work — especially if we are spending most of our free time sitting. “Try to find a healthy balance between sitting, standing and walking or other physical activities,” Hidde van deer Ploeg, the study’s lead author, told Reuters Health.

Source : Mashable

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Car Company Awards The Worst Driver In Paris

In Paris, finding a parking space is difficult. When the people do find one, they’ll do whatever it takes to fit into the parking space.

To promote Ford’s Active Park Assist technology, ad agency Ogilvy & Mather Paris (that also created the Tic Tac flash mob) set out to find the worst driver to help him/her park his/her car effortlessly.

The agency installed a giant pinball over a free parking space, and programed the bumpers of the front and rear cars to react as pinball bumpers.

The more the drivers hit the bumper, the higher the score—the worse drivers they are.

Watch the video below to find out who ‘The Worst Driver’ was (was it a man or a woman?), and what he/she won:

source : designtaxi.com

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